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Syrian Arab Republic: Schools in the Northern Syrian Camps: Thematic Report (November 2018)

Source: Assistance Coordination Unit Country: Syrian Arab Republic
Executive Summary The Information Management Unit (IMU), of the Assistance Coordination Unit (ACU), issues the Schools in the Northern Syria Camps report annually. This edition is considered the second of this report, where it highlights the impact of the ongoing war in Syria, the displacement environment on the education sector, the educational needs of the IDPs children, and schools from the different points of view. The IMU started this report by developing the questionnaire of the previous edition of the report Schools in the northern Syria camps edition 01 which was issued in August 2017 to reach a greater number of indicators and to cover all the information that actors bodies need, and support the educational process. This edition included four types of perception surveys for the first time, to reflect the education reality and its needs from multipoint of view, as well as to add qualitative data to the report along with quantitative data. Section 1: Methodology This section provides an overview of the methodology that IMU designed and followed during data collection, data analysis, visualization till issuing the final version of the report. IMU consulted Education experts about the work steps and the developmental mechanisms in the two successive editions of this report, and the enumerators about the available solutions in the event of any problem occurrence. This assessment includes 72 functional schools distributed within 62 IDP camps in north of the governorates of Aleppo and Idleb. Thirty ACU enumerators who work in IDP camps have participated in the data collection. 804 e-forms have been filled out by the enumerators distributed as follows: 72 basic questionnaires for schools were filled out through field visits to schools, 233 questionnaires were conducted with students, 219 questionnaires were conducted with parents, 229 questionnaires were conducted with teachers, 51 questionnaires were conducted with principals. The data collection period began in early January 2018 and lasted for one month. The report was published by the end of October 2018. Section 2: General Information This section presents information about number of schools in camps, distribution and registration at an official entity. According to collected data from the Education in Camps Working Group (ECWG) within the Education Cluster of the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the number of camps in the north of Syria is 331 camps that include 119 functional schools. As for the number of assessed schools by ACU enumerators it was 72 functional schools distributed within 62 IDP camps only among 226 assessed camps in Aleppo and Idleb governorates, while the remaining 164 camps were without schools. The study shows that 96% (69 schools) of the total assessed schools are registered at the Education Directorate (ED) of Syrian Interim Government (SIG), from another hand 4% (3 schools) were not registered at the ED of SIG or any other official entity. Section 3: School Buildings This section shows the types of buildings used for teaching in the camps and their security. The study shows that 55% (48 schools) of the assessed school buildings used for teaching in the northern Syria camps were cement block classrooms, 32% (28 schools) were a tent or more, and 14% (12 schools) are prefabricated classrooms (caravans). This section of the report also included detailed data on the status of doors and windows. During conducting interviews with the students , 5% (12 children) of the interviewed children stated that they do not feel safe at the school. However, 95% (221 children) stated that they feel safe at the school. Section 4: Water, Sanitation and Hygiene in the Schools Detailed information on the water resources of schools in camps in addition to the status of their sanitary facilities is brought into focus in this section. The results of the study showed that 65% (47 schools) of the assessed schools in camps receive drinking water by tankers and that 28% (20 schools) receive drinking water from the public network. Moreover, the number of water taps that need to be replaced 141 water taps. In regard to the adequacy of water taps, it was found that 58% (42 schools) of schools that provide water had more than 100 students per tap, while 8% (6 schools) without water taps. As for the availability of WCs at schools in camps, the results of the study show that 11% (8 schools) of the schools included in the survey without WCs. Whereas for the schools with WCs, it was found that (23%) (108 WCs) need simple maintenance, 4% (17 WCs) need full rehabilitation or replacement. Furthermore, 38% (24 schools) of schools with WCs disposed wastewater into cesspits. Section 5: School Supplies The school materials and basic needs are presented in this section. It was found through the study that 96% (69 schools) of the schools in northern Syria camps have desks, 4% (3 schools) do not have desks, where the students sit on the ground. Concerning the schools that have 17% (1,409 desks) of the assessed desks need maintenance, 4% (375 desks) are completely damaged and need replacement. The study also showed that 60% (43 schools) of the total schools in camps need heaters, 88% (63 schools) need printers, 61% (44 schools) need a chalkboard, and 96% (69 schools) need computers. During the students interviews, 18% (42 students) of the total number of surveyed students stated that they do not eat meals before coming to school. Regarding eating at school, 40% (93 students) of students stated that they bring their meals from home to school (eating a snack at school), while 57% (133 students) do not eat meals at school. Section 6: Educational Levels and Curriculum This section of the report explores the educational levels, curricula and the educational status of students within the camp schools. The results of the study showed that 7% (5 schools) of the assessed schools in northern Syria camps offer primary education only, 75% (54 schools) offer primary and lower secondary education, 13% (9 schools) offer all educational levels, and 6% (4 schools) offer lower secondary and upper secondary education. Through conducting teachers’ perception surveys 46% (106 teachers) of interviewed teachers reported that students suffer from the bullying of older students. In terms of the school curricula, based on the study 78% (56 schools) of the total camp schools completed more than 75% of the curriculum for students during the previous school year, 14% (10 schools) completed between 50% - 75% of the curriculum, and 4% (3 schools) completed between 25% and 50% of the curriculum. The assessment of the educational situation of teachers’ perception shows that 43% (94 teachers) of interviewed teachers reported that education before 2011 is better. Moreover, the study found that the ED of the SIG was the source for 55% of the total number of books used in camp schools, while used books (books that had been returned by students) were the source for 38% of used books. Section 7: Students This section provides detailed data on students #39; numbers according to their different categories, absences and late attendance, in addition to the faced difficulties. As the study showed the number of assessed students in northern Syria camps is 34,139 students (of both genders), where 52% (17,666 students) of them were females. Furthermore, students between (6 – 11) years old formed the largest age group of students in the assessed schools, with 80% (27,101 students of both genders) of the total enrolled students. When parents were surveyed about the enrollment of their children in 53% (115 persons) of the parents reported that all their children attend 24% (53 persons) reported that their children attend only the primary education 10% (21persons) reported that only males go to and 9% (20 persons) said that their children attend only the transitional grades, and do not attend the 9th and 12th grades. The study also showed that 88% (63 schools) of the assessed schools in the camps do not have kindergartens. During parents’ interviews, they were asked whether their children expressed unwillingness to go to school, 51% (112 persons) of surveyed parents said that their children sometimes express unwillingness to go to school, 6% (13 persons) said that their children always express unwillingness to go to school. One of the main difficulties encountered by students in obtaining a proper education at schools in camps was the shortage of educational materials, books and stationery. The second one was the child duty to help his family “child labor”. Section 8: Psychological Support and Children with Special Needs This section presents detailed data on children with special needs, psychological support and orphaned children. The number of students with special needs within the camp schools reached 107 students. It was also found that 32% (23 schools) of the camp schools have no trained teachers on psychological support. As for perception surveys conducted with teachers, 25% (57 teachers) shared that their students have expressed fear of being unsafe at their schools. The phenomena spread among students, the interviewed teachers n difficulty to concentration topped the list of the spread phenomena by 15% among st 14% of students suffer from low marks at 11% of students suffer from nervousity, agitation, and inability to sit in one place for a long 11% of students have difficulty in memo 10% of students look untidy, not clean and lack personal h and 9% of students have language problems (stuttering, difficulty in speaking or expressing themselves). Besides that, the report covered the number of orphan students, where there are 3,426 orphans’ student in the assessed camp schools. Section 9: Teachers This part of the report presents detailed data on teachers, the support they receive and their educational level. The number of teachers at schools in camps was 1,377 teachers (of both genders), where females represented 51% (699 female teachers) of the total teachers. The percentage of teachers enrolled in the educational process due to the shortage of qualified teachers was 33% (450 teachers) of the total teachers. Regarding the abilities of irregular teachers, 55% (28 principals) of assessed principals stated that the teaching level of irregular teachers was good, 12% (6% principals) stated that the teaching level of irregular teachers was average. The study also shows that 43% (999 teachers) of teachers receive salaries from various sources, and 27% (378 teachers) do not receive salaries at all. In the conducted surveys with teachers, 95% (218 teachers) reported that the income is not commensurate with the requirements of daily life. Section 10: Priorities and Recommendations The need for textbooks topped the list of priorities for the assessed camp schools in the north by 41%. Secondly came the need for books and stationery by 22%, while the need for salaries for the school staff came by 18%, and the need for heating fuel came with 10%.

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