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Senegal: Rice Fortification in Senegal - Landscape Analysis 2019

Source: World Food Programme Country: Senegal
Preface Globally, more than two billion people are affected by micronutrient deficiencies, or hidden hunger. These deficiencies, defined as the lack of one or more of the essential vitamins and minerals required for healthy growth, development, and functioning, affect all ages and socio-economic groups. Hidden hunger impacts socio-economic development at household as well as national level, and its short- and longterm consequences include maternal and child mortality, increased illness, mental retardation, and poor cognitive and physical development. All of these negatively impact a country’s GDP. As affirmed by the 2008 and 2013 Lancet Series on Maternal and Child Nutrition, the 2012 Copenhagen Consensus and the global Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement, multi-micronutrient fortification is among the most cost-effective strategies to reduce malnutrition. Rice is a staple food for more than three billion people across the globe where it can contribute up to as much as 70 percent of daily energy intake in some countries. This presents a nutritional problem: milled rice is a good source of energy, but a poor source of micronutrients. Where rice is a staple food, making it more nutritious through fortification with essential vitamins and minerals is a proven and cost-effective intervention to increase micronutrient intake among the general population.
Consumption of fortified rice increases micronutrient intake without requiring consumers to change their buying, preparation or cooking practices. Several programmes have been implemented in Senegal to address micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs), including mandatory fortification of wheat flour, cooking oil and salt, vitamin and mineral supplementation, home fortification using micronutrient powder, and promotion of dietary diversity at household level. MNDs, however, have persisted and more needs to be done to overcome the issue in Senegal. In Senegal, rice fortification has a great potential to reduce the prevalence of iron deficiency and other MNDs since rice is the most widely consumed cereal, with consumption estimated at 198g1 per person per day. Recognizing the potential of rice as a vehicle for fortification, World Food Programme is considering rice fortification as one strategy to prevent and control MNDs of its beneficiaries and is therefore taking steps to assess the feasibility and acceptability of including fortified rice as part of its food basket. This landscape analysis builds on the 2016 analysis supported by the Food Fortification Initiative (FFI) and the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) by presenting the most up-to-date data and information from recent interviews undertaken in Senegal in October and November 2018. This analysis aims to provide decisionmakers with a comprehensive understanding of the factors that will influence the feasibility and sustainability of rice fortification as an intervention to improve the Senegalese population’s micronutrient status. It provides a data refresh on the current status of malnutrition in the country and a detailed value analysis of the Senegalese rice value chain.
This landscape assesses different delivery options and ways to integrate rice fortification into the Senegalese rice supply chain while estimating the potential public health impact of such intervention. This report is a joint collaboration between the World Food Programme (WFP) and Nutrition International (NI) and is intended to inform the government, the private sector and the civil society of the potential of introducing rice fortification as a public health strategy to prevent MNDs in Senegal.


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